Walker Percy, The Second Coming

Last year I read and blogged on Walker Percy's novel, The Last Gentleman (1966), with my friend Bryce. Here is a description by the publisher: Will Barrett is the last gentleman, a twenty-five year old wanderer from the South living in New York City with no plans for the future and detached from his past. The purchase …

Apprentices to the Master and subjects of the King

On Sunday, our priest opened his sermon with two thought-provoking metaphors for discipleship: we are apprentices to the Master and subjects of the King. Jesus is the Master. What is his craft? Life. No one has perfected life as he did, and we are invited to become his apprentices in living well. Jesus is also the King. What is his …

Cutting reason down to size

In the London Review of Books, literary critic Terry Eagleton reviewed Clare Carlisle's new book, Philosopher of the Heart: The Restless Life of Soren Kierkegaard, "A Long Way from Galilee." I am fascinated by what he says about the anti-philosopher below: There are​ a number of modern thinkers who might be described as anti-philosophers. Anti-philosophers aren’t simply …

Caressing Jesus

The vocation of celibacy leaves a man untouched, at least by a beloved. But he is not without a persistent, even desperate craving for touch, none more satisfying than by his single and celibate Savior. For this reason, I was profoundly inspired by what Catholic theologian Paul J. Griffiths writes in Christian Flesh; he articulates my …

Three or four things that Americans will be known for

Years ago I watched Ken Burns' masterful documentary miniseries Jazz (2001), and now I am watching it again, this time listening to the music featured in the episodes. The essayist Gerald Early told the filmmaker that "when they study our civilization two thousand years from now, there will only be three things that Americans will be …