The Gift of Singleness

Monet,

Monet, “Man with Umbrella, Portrait of V. Jaquemont” (1868)

Marshall Segal, executive assistant to Pastor John Piper, writes in “Single, Satified, and Sent: Mission for the Not-Yet Married“:

If you’re single, Satan is after you.

Okay, he’s after all of us, but there are some unique dangers in singleness — especially in unwanted singleness. He loves to deceive and discourage single people in the church and derail our devotion and ministry. But God intends to use you, your faith, your time, and your singleness in radical ways right now, as you are.

You might come away from a reading of 1 Corinthians 7 with two categories in mind: those who will live, serve, and die single and those who must marry. Paul sings singleness’s praises, listing the spiritual benefits of being spouse-free. The single life can be (relatively) free from relational anxieties (7:32), worldly distractions (7:33), and wide open for worship, devotion, and ministry (7:35). So, Paul concludes, skip the ceremony, literally, and enjoy “your undivided devotion to the Lord.”

Most say, “More power to you, Paul… but I’m getting married.” Maybe temptation overwhelms you, and you need a God-honoring way to satisfy that longing (7:2). Maybe it’s abundantly clear that you need a helper to carry out God’s call on your life (or it’s abundantly clear to others that you do). Maybe you want to have kids and realized that you need help with that. Maybe you just have a deep, undeniable desire for a loving, committed companion. In each case, it is good for you to get married.

While it may seem like two categories at first, we soon discover in application that there are three: the single, the married, and the not-yet married. After all, as any single person knows, a desire for marriage does not a marriage make. My hope in reflecting on Paul’s words is to restore hope and ambition in the hearts of the not-yet married and set them solidly on mission in their singleness.

Perhaps the greatest temptation in singleness is to assume marriage will meet our unmet needs, solve our weaknesses, organize our lives, and unleash our gifts. Far from the solution, Paul makes marriage out to be a kind of problematic Plan B of Christian life and ministry. Marry if you must, but be warned, following Jesus is not easier when you join yourself to another sinner in a fallen world.

While marriage may bring joy, help, and relief in certain areas, it immediately multiplies your distractions because you’re intimately responsible for this other person, his or her needs, dreams, and growth. It’s a high calling and a good calling, but a demanding one that will keep you from all kinds of other good things.

Therefore, for the not-yet married, our (temporary) singleness is a gift. It really is. If God leads you to marriage, you may never again know a time like the one you’re in right now. A season of singleness is not merely the minor leagues of marriage. It has the potential to be a unique period of undivided devotion to Christ and undistracted ministry to others.

With the Spirit in you and the calendar clear, God has given you the means to make a lasting difference for his kingdom. You’re all dressed up, having every spiritual blessing in the heavenly places (Ephesians 1:3), with literally everywhere to go.

With God’s help and leading, you have the freedom to invest yourself, your time, your resources, your youth, and your flexibility in relationships, ministries, and causes that can bear unbelievable fruit.

In the article, Segal offers “eight suggestions for making the most of your net-yet married life.” Here’s the list:

  1. Avoid trading marital distractions for other distractions.
  2. Say “Yes” to the spontaneous.
  3. Practice selflessness while you’re still alone.
  4. Do radical, time-consuming things for God.
  5. Spend time with married people.
  6. Spend time with not-yet married people.
  7. Find a fiancé on the front lines.
  8. While you wait, hope in Jesus more than marriage.

Read the rest of the article to hear how these suggestions are developed.

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2 thoughts on “The Gift of Singleness

  1. Thank you for posting this. As someone who is single (I mean I’m only 19), this provides a relieving mindset for the single life (whether desiring to marry or to stay single). I personally would like to get married, but lack a community of people my age that share my beliefs, which provides bad statistics for me finding a fitting partner in undergraduate school. However, I should take advantage of my time as a single man, and trust that the Lord will give me joy whether I am single or with wife.

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